Definiteness of Purpose

Put yourself in a state of mind where you say to yourself, ‘Here is an opportunity for me to celebrate like never before, my own power, my own ability to get myself to do whatever is necessary’.” ~ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 Can there be a greater example of what a person can accomplish through resolve and commitment than the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.? In his most notable speech, Dr. King uttered the words that now echo through our minds, “I have a dream…” But let’s call it what it really was, not a dream, but rather a goal. Yes, it may well have begun as a dream, but Dr. King was able to put himself in a state of mind to say, “Here is an opportunity for me to celebrate like never before, my own power, my own ability to get myself to do whatever is necessary”, and that’s precisely what he did.

In Brian Tracy’s book, GOALS!, he refers to it as “finding your definite purpose”. Equality for all was Dr. King’s definite purpose. Once he found his passion to achieve it, he was able to put his ability to work in order to achieve it. We can do the same exact thing with whatever it is that is our definite purpose. Napoleon Hill described it this way – “There is one quality which one must possess to win, and that is definiteness of purpose, the knowledge of what one wants and the burning desire to possess it.”

Dr. King is a man of many legacies, not the least of which is that he demonstrated to us what can be accomplished with a definiteness of purpose burning inside. So how do we find this definiteness of purpose? Again referring to Brian Tracy’s, GOALS!, he says we must first activate the reticular cortex; an organ in the brain that works like a switchboard, routing thoughts and information. When you send a message of a particular and well-defined goal to the reticular cortex, it begins to make you intensely aware of and alert to people, information and opportunities in your environment that will help you achieve your goal.

Tracy suggests this exercise; write out your top ten most clearly defined goals. Then one by one, determine which of your goals would assist you the most in achieving all of your goals. This one defining goal would become your definite purpose. It is the one goal most important to you at that moment.

This goal must be;

  1. Something you personally really want.
  2. Clear and specific.
  3. Measurable and quantifiable.
  4. Believable and achievable.
  5. Having a reasonable probability of success.
  6. In harmony with your other goals.

 The key question for determining your major definite purpose is “What one great thing would you dare to dream if you knew you could not fail?” Whatever your answer is to this question, if you write it down, ignite your reticular cortex, and put yourself in a state of mind to say, “Here is an opportunity for me to celebrate like never before, my own power, my own ability to get myself to do whatever is necessary”, you tremendously increase the chances of making your definite purpose come to fruition, just as Dr. King did with his.

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Monty Rainey is a District Manager working in the self storage industry since 1996 and currently overseeing 21 stores in the Austin & San Antonio, TX area. He is also a leadership coach and public speaker. For a free consultation, please contact Monty at 830-743-2139 or visit his website at http://www.montyrainey.com .

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About montyrainey

Public Speaker and District Manager. Mission: To empower and inspire others professionally, personally and spiritually to elevate their lives to a higher level.
This entry was posted in Character, Goals, History, Inspiration, Mission, Purpose and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Definiteness of Purpose

  1. Pingback: Drifting, Without Aim or Purpose, is the First Cause of Failure | My Mindset Matters

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